Summarize what you found surprising or particularly important about your chosen cultural perspective and the idea of intercultural competence in general.

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching discussion question and need a sample draft to help me learn.“Different strokes for different folks.” As cultures interface more as a result of global mobility, we need to learn communication skills—both verbal and nonverbal. Different cultural backgrounds produce different mores of what is polite or respectful, what is expected of students, how punctuality is regarded, and basic morals, as well as the more obvious differences in food, clothes, language, and holidays.Global citizenship starts with awareness of our interdependence, and intercultural competence is crucial to embracing global citizenship. The ability to successfully communicate, work, and learn with people of other cultures is called “intercultural competence.” As the cultural interactions increase, the more important intercultural competence becomes. The quickest way to develop this is through international friends. Another way is to share insights by others who identify cultural differences. This Discussion is designed to generate awareness of other cultures to maximize learning in increasingly multicultural higher education.Post a brief summary of the chapter you chose to read, featuring highlights relevant to higher education leadership.Summarize what you found surprising or particularly important about your chosen cultural perspective and the idea of intercultural competence in general.
Analyze and discuss what implications these cultural insights have for teaching and learning in higher education, citing this week’s Resources. Required ReadingsBennett, J. M. (2009). Cultivating intercultural competence: A process perspective. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 121-135). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Deardorff, D. K. (2009). Synthesizing conceptualizations of intercultural competence: A summary and emerging themes. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 264-269). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Hofstede, G. J. (2009). The moral circle in intercultural competence: Trust across cultures. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 85-98). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Kim, Y. Y. (2009). The identity factor in intercultural competence. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 53-62). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Choose one chapter from the following seven options that most relates to the country you have been using for your course assignments:Ashwill, M. A., & Oanh, D. T. H. (2009). Developing globally competent citizens: The contrasting cases of the United States and Vietnam. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 141-156). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Chen, G.-M., & An, R. (2009). A Chinese model of intercultural leadership competence. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 196-205). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Manian, R., & Naidu, S. (2009). India: A cross-cultural overview of intercultural competence. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 233-248). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Medina-L’pez-Portillo, A., & Sinnigen, J. H. (2009). Interculturality versus intercultural competences in Latin America. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 249-262). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Moosm’ller, A., & Sch’nhuth, M. (2009). Intercultural competence in German discourse. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 209-225). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Nwosu, P. O. (2009). Understanding Africans’ conceptualizations of intercultural competence. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 158-177). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Zaharna, R. S. (2009). An associative approach to intercultural communication competence in the Arab world. In D. K. Deardorff (Ed.), The Sage handbook of intercultural competence (pp. 179-193). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Copyright 2009 Sage Publications Inc. Books. Used with permission from Sage via the Copyright Clearance Center.Document: Table for Week 7 Application (Word document)Required Media”Learning Goes Global” (approximately 16 minutes)Higher-education leaders in Malaysia, Turkey, France, and Spain discuss curricular and instructional priorities at their campuses. Focus on each speaker’s priorities by completing the Table for Week 7 Application in preparation for this week’s assignment.Optional ResourcesCheng, K. (2007). The postindustrial workplace and challenges to education. In Suarez-Orozco, M. M. (Ed.), Learning in the global era: International perspectives on globalization and education (pp. 175-190). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Levy, F., & Murnane, R. J. (2007). How computerized work and globalization shape human skill demands. In Suarez-Orozco, M. M. (Ed.), Learning in the global era: International perspectives on globalization and education (pp. 158-173). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
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